Pineapple Mango Guacamole

mango_Ataulfo honey-mango

Mangos are in peak season, so find ways to include these refreshing tropical fruits in your daily eating plan. They’re filled with nutritious goodness, flavor, and antioxidants.

Here’s why this colorful fruit makes the A-list of Fountain-of-Youth Foods. Pair it with avocados, an amazingly healthy superfood, that’s rich in fiber, healthy fats and phytonutrients and you’ll have a naturally creamy salsa for fresh fish, chicken or tortilla chips.

Ingredients:

  • 2 large ripe avocados, diced
  • 1/2 medium red onion
  • Juice from 3/4 of a whole lime
  • 1-2 Tbsp. cilantro, chopped
  • Freshly ground pepper
  • 1/16 of 1 jalapeño, diced (use more or less based on your desired level of heat)
  • 1 large ripe mango (other than the Honey Mango variety), diced
  • 14 oz. Pineapple-Honey Mango Salsa* (see below)

1. Mix the above ingredients in a medium bowl and serve.

*Pineapple-Honey Mango Salsa (Tastes great on its own!)

  • 4 honey mangos (a.k.a. Manila or Ataulfo Mango), diced
  • 1/4 of 1 small fresh pineapple, diced
  • 1/16 of 1 jalapeño (to taste)
  • 1/4 c. red onions
  • 1/2 c. cilantro, chopped
  • 3/4 of 1 large red bell pepper, diced
  • Juice from 1 lemon
  • Juice from 1 lime

Apple c heart symbol_40x54Fit Tip: Look for honey mangos that have some ‘wrinkling’ on the outside. They may look like they’re older, but that’s when they are sweet, creamy in texture, and ripe! Also, if you’re in a hurry, mix in your favorite prepared guacamole (I like Whole Foods’ fresh guacamole) with the fresh mango, jalapeño and Pineapple-Mango Salsa.

Fusilli with Rapini and Roasted Garlic

Rapini / Broccoli RabeWhat is rapini? Also known as broccoli rabe, rapini belongs to the cruciferous, or cabbage, vegetable family and is highly nutritious as well as delicious. It is a cousin to other ‘super-veggies’ that include broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, bok choy, arugula, kale, and mustard seeds and is a great source of fiber, minerals, and vitamins. Being rich in disease-fighting phytochemicals, particularly sulforaphane, these healthy greens have potential anti-cancer properties.

‘Rapini’ is actually a culinary term for the edible leaves, stems, and shoots of cruciferous crops. So you can eat every bit of this plant! This vegetable has thick tender stems, flower buds, and mild peppery leaves. Rapini can have a bitter edge to it which gives it it’s characteristic flavor. The bitterness, however, may vary bunch to bunch and in season, but is toned down when cooked. A long-standing favorite in Italian cuisine, rapini pairs well with pasta and polenta.

Here’s a simple 5-ingredient recipe that makes an easy one-pot entrée or side dish:    Continue reading “Fusilli with Rapini and Roasted Garlic”

Fit TV | The Raw Truth About Vegetables


VIDEO: Research scientists have performed various studies on the valuable life-extending antioxidants in vegetables. These studies reveal whether it’s healthier to eat vegetables raw or cooked. Karen Owoc, The Health Reporter, hosts this compact segment of health news in The Health Reporter Minute.

Soy Foods and Breast Cancer Survivors

New studies show soy is now good for breast cancer survivors

For years, there’s been confusing debate over whether breast cancer survivors should eat soy. However, a new study presented at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) found that women who ate the most soy food didn’t increase their risk of breast cancer recurrence, but reduced their risk.

Since soy foods contain large amounts of isoflavones, survivors had been advised against consuming them. Isoflavones are phytochemicals (chemicals found in plants) that have both estrogen-like and anti-estrogenic effects.   Continue reading “Soy Foods and Breast Cancer Survivors”