Protect Your Pets from Heat Stroke

golden retriever puppy dog hugging british cat. isolated on whitYour pets are just as vulnerable to heat exhaustion and heat stroke as their humans. You sweat to keep yourself from overheating.  But how do your four-legged friends keep their cool?

How Your Pets Sweat

Dogs and other pets don’t sweat through their skin and fur. Their sweat glands are located in their foot pads. They cool themselves through their paws and by panting through their noses and mouths. (Be sure you don’t muzzle your dog! They need to freely pant.)

It’s especially important to protect their paws, so avoid walking your dog on dangerously hot surfaces like sand (at the beach), concrete, or asphalt as they can severely burn their foot pads. Before taking your dog for a walk, place your hand or bare foot on the walking surface for 10 seconds. If it’s too hot for you, then it’s too hot for your pet! Opt for cool grass or shady areas.

Signs of Heat Stroke

Per veterinarians Drs. Foster and Smith, signs of heat stroke in dogs include:    Continue reading “Protect Your Pets from Heat Stroke”

Fit TV | Anxiety and Depression Are Different in Men

June is Men’s Health Month

VIDEO: Three men/boys kill themselves every hour of every day. Would you recognize the symptoms if your son, husband, father or friend is depressed? Men generally don’t show the “classic” signs of depression nor do they typically reach out for help or seek medical attention.

Even trained clinicians are less likely to correctly diagnose depression in men than in women. In this episode, I talk with Dr. Will Courtenay, “The Men’s Doc”, an internationally-recognized expert on men’s emotional health. We discuss the symptoms and causes leading up to depression in men, including postpartum depression in men. (Yes, really!)

It wasn’t that long ago that actor and comedian Robin Williams shocked the world by killing himself. Williams battled drug and alcohol abuse for decades and had open heart surgery in 2009. Heart patients often experience anxiety after their cardiac event.

This episode also includes a three-minute segment on “Pet Health”. Pets often help alleviate depression. Find out how to care for your senior pet with San Ramon veterinarian Dr. Glen Weber.

Feds Say Don’t Give Dogs a Bone

Here’s a bit of health news for pet owners.  The FDA said dogs should not be given bones of any kind.  According to a vet at the FDA, even large bones, like a ham or a roast, are unsafe.

“Some people think it’s safe to give dogs large bones,” said Carmela Stamper, a veterinarian in the Center for Veterinary Medicine at the FDA.  “Bones are unsafe no matter what their size.”

All bones can cause broken teeth, constipation, and mouth or tongue injuries.  Also, bones or bone fragments can get stuck in a dog’s esophagus or even its stomach, which might require surgery.  Worse yet, a real bone can cause a deadly bacterial infection of the abdomen, called peritonitis.  This happens when bone fragments poke holes in a dog’s stomach or intestines.