KRON 4 | How Fiber Lengthens Your Life

For good health, you’ve probably been told to eat more fiber — but all fibers are not alike. If you have risk factors for coronary artery disease and stroke, such as belly fat, diabetes, high cholesterol, or obesity, it’s a good idea to know the difference. Here’s how fiber in general can add years to your life.

Fiber Basics

Dietary fibers are found naturally in plants. They’re types of carbohydrates that don’t break down in your stomach and pass through your system pretty much intact. Fiber refers to carbohydrates, such as:

  • Cellulose
  • Dextrin
  • Inulin
  • Lignin
  • Chitins
  • Pectins
  • Beta-glucans
  • Waxes
  • Oligosaccharides

Fiber is separated into two main types: soluble fiber and insoluble fiber. They’re different in how they react with water — and because of that, they have a different effect on your body.

KRON 4 Fiber 2

Soluble Fiber – “The Cholesterol Sponge”

Soluble fiber dissolves in water and forms a viscous gel (soft and sticky) in the intestines which:

  • Helps lower LDL cholesterol* (the “bad” cholesterol). Soluble fiber soaks up cholesterol-laden bile in your intestine and eliminates them with other waste. Increasing fiber just 7 gm a day reduced stroke risk by 7% and heart disease risk by 9%.
  • Slows down digestion which helps control blood sugar and diabetes. Diabetes is a risk factor for heart disease.
  • Helps control body weight by making you feel full longer. It slows the emptying of food through the gastrointestinal tract. An additional 10 grams of soluble fiber per day reduced visceral fat by 4% over a 5-year period.

*LDL cholesterol is needed to produce hormones and provide structure to cell membranes, but because excesses can accumulate in the blood vessels and promote atherosclerosis, it’s been branded as the “bad” cholesterol.   

Sources High in Soluble Fiber

Many foods have both soluble AND insoluble fibers with some having predominantly more of one than the other.

  • Oats, oat bran
  • Barley
  • Beans, split peas, lentils
  • Apples, avocados, pears, citrus fruits (but not fruit juices)
KRON 4 Fiber_soluble fiber
Example of 10 grams of SOLUBLE fiber and over 20 grams of TOTAL fiber (both soluble and insoluble)

Insoluble Fiber – “Nature’s Broom”

Insoluble fiber acts like “nature’s broom”. It sweeps through your gastrointestinal tract and helps prevent constipation and colon cancer. Insoluble fiber does NOT dissolve in water, but absorbs water as it travels through your digestive tract which eases elimination, so it:    Continue reading “KRON 4 | How Fiber Lengthens Your Life”

When Organic Produce Pays Off

Organic vs. Conventional - How do you choose?
Organic vs. conventional – Is is worth the price?

Fresh fruits and vegetables are excellent sources of antioxidants, vitamins, minerals, and fiber and a special treat at any time of year.  However, fruits consistently top the list of produce that are most contaminated by pesticides.

Buying pesticide-free produce is the best choice, but they’re generally more costly or may be unavailable. Knowing when it’s smart to buy organic and when to go conventional, you’ll save yourself some extra money.    Continue reading “When Organic Produce Pays Off”

How Washing Your Clothes Can Make Them Dirtier

Pre-washing machine era. Women used straw to cushion their knees.

Clothes washer technology has reduced the drudgery of scrubbing clothes to get them clean — much nicer than the days of pounding or rubbing the clothing on rocks in a river or against a corrugated wash board. But even the high efficiency, highest tech agitators need your helping hand. Otherwise, washing your clothes can actually make them dirtier.

Wash Before Wearing

First, always wash new clothes before wearing them. New fabric finishes contain formaldehyde, fragranced starches, and insecticides. Soak them in one cup or more of baking soda before washing them to neutralize these potentially allergenic chemicals.   Continue reading “How Washing Your Clothes Can Make Them Dirtier”

The Dirty Dozen and Clean Fifteen

[TV segment #0001   Producer: Karen Owoc

A look at the most and least pesticide contaminated fruits and vegetables.    The written blog post can be found here.