Protect Your Brain from Shrinking

Alzheimer’s Predictor

Researchers are optimistic that they found a new way to predict Alzheimer’s disease, but learn how to PROTECT your brain from Alzheimer’s with Brain Boot Camp.

I’d like to invite you to “Like” my new Facebook page. The scientific evidence is clear: brain aging begins as early as your twenties. Brain Boot Camp is a fun, interactive class! Don’t let your brain grow old before you do!  http://Facebook.com/brainbootcampers

When Life Hurts…

I came across these words, and they could not have been more timely. May they help when you feel weary and your heart aches.

Remember  The dementia patient is not giving you a hard time. The dementia patient is having a hard time.

A crying elderly woman covering her face

Fit Minute | Check Cholesterol for Alzheimer’s Risk

cholesterol_dollarphotoclub_67703499_600x410

If you think getting Alzheimer’s disease is a just a consequence of bad genes or bad luck, think again. Researchers suggest you could have some control over your getting the disease.

A UC Davis study revealed that healthy cholesterol levels not only keep your heart healthy, but your brain too. It is the first study to specifically link cholesterol to amyloid plaques in the brain of living human participants. Deposits of amyloid plaque (detected by a brain scan) are indicative of Alzheimer’s disease.

What is Amyloid Plaque?

Amyloid beta (or beta amyloid) is a protein necessary for normal brain activity. But, in the early stages of Alzheimers, this protein forms deposits, known as amyloid plaques, which disrupt communication between nerve cells in your brain.    Continue reading “Fit Minute | Check Cholesterol for Alzheimer’s Risk”

New Risk Factors for Memory Loss

High cholesterol can lead to dementia.

A new study revealed that high cholesterol and high blood pressure are not only risk factors for heart disease, but for early memory loss as well.  Cardiovascular risk and cognitive function were tested in nearly 5,000 men and women over age 55.

The researchers studied participants for 10 years and found those with a ten percent higher risk of cardiovascular problems also scored poorly on cognitive tests.  The tests measured reasoning, memory, fluency, and vocabulary and the results were then compared to their Framingham risk score.   Continue reading “New Risk Factors for Memory Loss”