KRON 4 | Protect Your Pooch from Heatstroke and Severely Burned Paws

Protect Your Pooch from Heatstroke

Your pets are just as vulnerable to heat exhaustion and heat stroke as their humans. You sweat to keep yourself from overheating. Here’s how to be sure your four-legged friends keep their cool too.

How Your Pets Sweat

Dogs and other pets don’t sweat through their skin and fur. Their sweat glands are located in their foot pads.

  • They cool themselves through their paws, but these few sweat glands are not significant enough to regulate their body temperature alone.
  • Their primary method of cooling is by panting rapidly through their noses and mouths. So be sure you don’t muzzle your dog! They need to freely pant.

Protect Their Paws

KRON 4_Pooch Heatstroke1

  • Along with sand, concrete, and asphalt, artificial (synthetic) turf get very hot too.
  • Opt for cool grass or shady areas.

Warning Signs of Overheating

Fortunately, it’s not very difficult to see signs of overheating in dogs. Watch for the subtle, early signs of heat stroke.

KRON 4_Pooch Heatstroke2

Signs of Heat Exhaustion/Heat Stroke

A dangerously overheated dog may exhibit the following signs:

    • Collapsing or convulsions
    • Vomiting (sometimes with blood)
    • Diarrhea
    • Red or pale gums
    • Bright red tongue
    • Glazed eyes
    • Rapid heart rate
    • Dizziness 
    • Lack of coordination (wobbly or drunken gait)
    • Fever (usually 103 and 106 degrees Fahrenheit and higher)
    • Lethargy
    • Loss of consciousness (cannot be awakened)
    • Small amounts of or no urine

*Heat stroke can progress to organ failure, seizures, coma, cardiac arrest, and death.

Risk Factors for Overheating   

Continue reading “KRON 4 | Protect Your Pooch from Heatstroke and Severely Burned Paws”

Protect Your Pets from Heat Stroke

golden retriever puppy dog hugging british cat. isolated on whitYour pets are just as vulnerable to heat exhaustion and heat stroke as their humans. You sweat to keep yourself from overheating.  But how do your four-legged friends keep their cool?

How Your Pets Sweat

Dogs and other pets don’t sweat through their skin and fur. Their sweat glands are located in their foot pads. They cool themselves through their paws and by panting through their noses and mouths. (Be sure you don’t muzzle your dog! They need to freely pant.)

It’s especially important to protect their paws, so avoid walking your dog on dangerously hot surfaces like sand (at the beach), concrete, or asphalt as they can severely burn their foot pads. Before taking your dog for a walk, place your hand or bare foot on the walking surface for 10 seconds. If it’s too hot for you, then it’s too hot for your pet! Opt for cool grass or shady areas.

Signs of Heat Stroke

Per veterinarians Drs. Foster and Smith, signs of heat stroke in dogs include:    Continue reading “Protect Your Pets from Heat Stroke”

Why You Should Check the Color of Your Pee

Color of Pee_cropped

See the complete list of 11 colors here:  https://www.pinterest.com/karenowoc/fit-tips-quick-health-bites/

Urine comes in a variety of colors (and smells) which can say a lot about you. Check out this infographic from the Cleveland Clinic. Your pee color is a good barometer for your level of hydration. Be sure to drink enough water — especially if you exercise, the weather is warm or you’re sweating a lot from dreadful hot flashes!

Dehydration is a risk factor for painful kidney stones and low blood pressure (your blood loses volume) whereby your brain and muscles can’t get enough oxygen. A good rule of thumb is to drink half your weight in ounces. For example, if you weigh 150 pounds, try to drink 75 ounces of water per day which is a little more than 9 cups. Add exercise and you’ll need to drink even more.

Apple c heart symbol_40x54Fit Tip: If you’re not a water drinker,  “eat” your fluids by consuming a lot of ‘water-rich’ foods like fruits and vegetables.  Lettuce is 95% water, watermelon 92%, oranges 88%, and apples are 84% water. Also, soups made with lots of broth and veggies are an excellent way to get hydrated.

Pre-Exercise Hydration

water glassWhen you’re working out, sweaty and thirsty, you’re likely to think about drinking some water. But it’s just as important to think about it BEFORE you work out and here’s why.

Exercise and Water Basics

When exercising, your muscles contract and generate internal heat. To prevent overheating, the heat must be promptly dissipated via your body’s cooling mechanism (sweating). Sweat cools the surface of the skin and decreases your body temperature.

Maintaining good hydration levels during exercise is critical to regulating body temperature (thermoregulation) and regulating blood pressure. When you’re dehydrated, your body’s mechanism to get rid of heat shuts down which can result in heat exhaustion or worse yet, heat stroke.

Neuromuscular Activity

By keeping your body adequately hydrated, you can perform at your optimal level. Without adequate water, your neuromuscular activity slows down which affects how fast and how hard your muscles can contract. As a result, you can experience a loss of strength, reduced endurance and/or slower reaction and response times.   Continue reading “Pre-Exercise Hydration”

Staying Hydrated

Water not only quenches the thirst, it’s vital for organs to function.  It’s needed for digestion, to carry nutrients and oxygen, control blood pressure, and to even lubricate joints. Without enough water, skin, the largest organ in the body, can become dry and wrinkled. Do you drink enough water every day?

Blood thickens without water and the circulatory system has to work harder.

Up to 75% of a person’s body weight is water. Water is lost during breathing when humidified air leaves the body as well as through daily urination, sweat and stool.

In a day’s work, the body loses about eight to twelve cups of water and all of that fluid needs to go back in. When you become dehydrated, your blood loses volume and your heart cannot circulate blood effectively. The eventual result is heart failure.

A loss of just 2% of body weight can impair exercise performance by decreasing your sweat rate and increasing your core temperature (causing exhaustion from heat strain) and by decreasing maximal cardiac output (i.e., the highest pumping capacity of the heart that can be achieved during exercise). Continue reading “Staying Hydrated”