KRON 4 | You Could Have Heart Failure and Not Know It

A Simple Way to Suspect Heart Failure

Do you get short of breath when you bend forward, such as to tie your shoelaces or put on a sock? If so, here’s what this symptom could mean and why you shouldn’t ignore it.

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What this Symptom Could Mean

If you bend forward and get short of breath, do NOT ignore this symptom! This symptom was recently coined as “bendopnea” (pronounced bend-op-nee-ah). This symptom could be a sign of heart failure.

A study of 102 heart failure patients showed bendopnea was present in 28% of their subjects (29 out of 102 subjects). When bending over, the average time it took for these symptoms to appear was eight seconds. Some patients thought their bendopnea was due to being out of shape or overweight, but were more likely to have other symptoms of advanced disease.

Try this test:  Sit down and bend forward at the waist. Are you short of breath within 30 seconds? If you have “bendopnea”, you have:

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What is Heart Failure?

Heart failure, often referred to as congestive heart failure or (CHF), is a serious condition, but people often mistakenly think that it means that the heart has stopped beating.

Heart failure occurs when one or more chambers of the heart “fail” to keep up with the volume of blood blowing through them. The heart cannot pump enough blood and oxygen to maintain blood flow to other organs in your body. The reoxygenated blood from your lungs starts building up inside your lungs when your heart can’t keep up with ejecting it to other organs in need.

The buildup of blood causes fluid (mainly water) to leak from the small blood vessels (capillaries). That is, the arms, lungs, legs, feet, ankles, and other organs become “congested” with blood and fluid which explains how “congestive heart failure” got its name.

First Signs and Symptoms of Heart Failure   

Continue reading “KRON 4 | You Could Have Heart Failure and Not Know It”

KRON 4 | Why Sugar Causes Wrinkles and Heart Disease

A 15-year study on “added sugar” and heart disease found that participants were twice as likely to die from heart disease who consumed 25 percent or more of daily calories from added sugar compared to those that consumed 10 percent or less. Weekend anchor Marty Gonzalez on “KRON 4 Morning News Weekend” and I talk about sugar and its link to aging.

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KRON 4 Sugar5    Continue reading “KRON 4 | Why Sugar Causes Wrinkles and Heart Disease”

Fit Minute | ‘Bendopnea’ – Do NOT Ignore this Symptom

Do you get short of breath when you bend forward, such as to tie your shoelaces or put on a sock? If so, this is a symptom recently coined as “bendopnea” (pronounced bend-op-nee-ah).

A study of 102 heart failure patients showed bendopnea was present in 29 out of 102 subjects (28%). The average time it took for these symptoms to appear was eight seconds. Some patients thought their bendopnea was due to being out of shape or overweight, but were more likely to have other symptoms of advanced disease.

Heart failure, often referred to as congestive heart failure or (CHF), is a serious condition, but people often mistakenly think that it means that the heart has stopped beating. Heart failure occurs when your heart cannot pump enough blood and oxygen to maintain blood flow to other organs in your body. The reoxygenated blood from your lungs starts building up inside your lungs when your heart can’t keep up with ejecting it to other organs in need. The first signs and symptoms that you’ll notice are:

  • Shortness of breath (worse with exertion and/or while lying down)
  • Excessive fatigue
  • Swelling in the lower extremities (legs, ankles, feet)

Chest pain, including angina, is not typically a complaint with CHF. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 5.7 million people in the United States have heart failure. Heart Failure Fact Sheet

Try this test:  Sit down and bend forward at the waist. Are you short of breath within 30 seconds? If you have bendopnea, you have:

  • Too much fluid in your body
  • Elevated pressure in your heart and your pulmonary veins and capillaries
  • Increased pressure when leaning forward (bending)

Risk Factors for Heart Failure

  • Coronary artery disease (the most common type of heart disease)
  • History of a heart attack
  • High blood pressure
  • Atrial fibrillation
  • Diabetes
  • Smoking
  • Not enough physical activity
  • Overweight/obesity
  • Valvular heart disease
  • Excess alcohol intake

Apple c heart symbol_40x54Fit Tip: If you have bendopnea, be sure to tell your physician. It can be difficult to assess when you are retaining fluid. This assessment is a simple and noninvasive tool to diagnose excessive fluid retention and compromised blood flow.

Source:
Study by the Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. Characterization of a novel symptom of advanced heart failure: bendopnea. Journal of the American College of Cardiology. 2014.

Fit Minute | Is Alcohol Good for YOU?

Pouring red wine_310px_PDThe answer to this question depends on the dose and the person. Because everyone has unique personal and family histories, the risks and benefits of drinking alcohol will be different for each person. But here’s a recent study to consider before sipping that next drink…

  • New study* finds moderate alcohol consumption (defined as drinking 1-3 drinks/day) may increase risk for atrial fibrillation (A-fib or AF).
  • Wine and liquor (but not beer) are correlated with developing AF.
  • Alcohol in small amounts  and not daily may be okay BUT… if you notice AF symptoms when drinking, STOP to potentially stop AF and prevent long-term damage.

AF or A-fib = Most common heart rhythm that increases risk of stroke and heart failure. This rhythm is irregular, chaotic and often rapid which commonly causes poor blood flow to the body. AF may come and go, or it may not go away which may require emergency treatment.

AF symptoms:

  • Lack of energy
  • Dizziness
  • Shortness of breath
  • Heart palpitations
  • Chest pain

*12-year study; 79,019 men/women between ages 45 and 83; free of AF. Published in American College of Cardiology, July 2014.