Lower Your Blood Pressure with Food

Did you know a sweet potato has ___ much more potassium as banana?
Did you know that a sweet potato has 65% more potassium than a banana?

“Low Sodium”, “Salt-Free”, “Reduced Sodium”, “Unsalted”. Living a healthy life today means you don’t shake or utter that four-letter word… SALT. You’ve banished it from your favorite recipes, family table and your heart-healthy pantry. But the dietary approach to managing your blood pressure involves another key mineral — not just salt.

Low levels of potassium in your diet may be just as much of a risk factor for high blood pressure as high levels of sodium. Aim for a balance of less salt and more potassium in your daily eating plan. Here’s why…

Potassium helps to:

  • Relax your blood vessel walls¹ (contributing to more flexible arteries)
  • Lower your blood pressure (by helping you excrete excess sodium through your urine)
  • Reduce damage to your arteries (from the decrease in pressure)

Not only do studies suggest a link between low potassium levels and high blood pressure² but to higher glucose/insulin levels as well. See VIDEO: Potassium and Type 2 Diabetes   

Products containing potassium

Not Just Bananas

Eat more potassium-rich foods, such as a wide variety of fruits, vegetables, and legumes — not just bananas. Many people think of bananas when they think of foods high in potassium, but they are actually near the bottom of the list of high potassium foods (over 400 mg. potassium per serving):    Continue reading “Lower Your Blood Pressure with Food”

How to Store Your Groceries

How to Store Your Groceries

Save money! The most expensive food you can buy is the food that spoils and gets thrown away. This list tells you where to store, how to store and how long the following will keep:

  • Fruits
  • Vegetables
  • Herbs
  • Meat, Fish and Eggs
  • Bread and Dairy

For the complete list: https://www.pinterest.com/karenowoc/50-fit-tips-to-eat-fresh/

When Organic Produce Pays Off

Organic vs. Conventional - How do you choose?
Organic vs. conventional – Is is worth the price?

Fresh fruits and vegetables are excellent sources of antioxidants, vitamins, minerals, and fiber and a special treat at any time of year.  However, fruits consistently top the list of produce that are most contaminated by pesticides.

Buying pesticide-free produce is the best choice, but they’re generally more costly or may be unavailable. Knowing when it’s smart to buy organic and when to go conventional, you’ll save yourself some extra money.    Continue reading “When Organic Produce Pays Off”

Celebrity Slimming Secrets

Ever wonder how your favorite A-list celebrities maintain their million-dollar bodies? Or snap back into silver screen shape so quickly post-pregnancy? Here are some of Hollywood’s favorite health strategies that really work and a few that you should avoid.

1. Invest in Sweat Equity:  Many celebs like Pilates, yoga and running to get fit, flexible and firm. To lose fat fast though, your choice of physical activity needs to be sustained at a level of intensity that’s appropriate for you. Long leisurely walks around the block or on the beach are great for de-stressing and innervating muscles, but won’t knock off 10 to 20 pounds anytime soon. To boost fat burning, you have to raise your heart rate for at least 20 to 30 minutes daily where you’re exercising at your ‘training heart rate’.  To determine this level of intensity, have a certified fitness trainer calculate your rate for you.   Continue reading “Celebrity Slimming Secrets”

Staying Hydrated

Water not only quenches the thirst, it’s vital for organs to function.  It’s needed for digestion, to carry nutrients and oxygen, control blood pressure, and to even lubricate joints.  Without enough water, skin, the largest organ in the body, can become dry and wrinkled. Do you drink enough water every day?

Blood thickens without water and the circulatory system has to work harder.

Up to 75% of a person’s body weight is water.   Water is lost during breathing when humidified air leaves the body as well as through daily urination, sweat and stool.

In a day’s work, the body loses about eight to twelve cups of water and all of that fluid needs to go back in.  When you become dehydrated, your blood loses volume and your heart cannot circulate blood effectively. The eventual result is heart failure.

A loss of just 2% of body weight can impair exercise performance by decreasing your sweat rate and increasing your core temperature (causing exhaustion from heat strain) and by decreasing maximal cardiac output (i.e., the highest pumping capacity of the heart that can be achieved during exercise). Continue reading “Staying Hydrated”