Inflammation | Fish-Free Omega-3’s

Cat fish and mouse isolated on white background“Eat more fish.” How many times have you heard those three words? Well, what if you don’t like fish? Or you’re a vegetarian? No worries. There is a fish-free omega-3 alternative, so you can leave the fish to those who love it.

A third type of omega-3 is found in plant oils  and is known as alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). The body partially converts ALA to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), that is, the omega-3 fatty acids found in fish.

It’s not known if vegetable and fish omega-3’s are equally beneficial, but nevertheless, these fatty acids are essential for good health and most Americans don’t get enough of either type. Aim for at least one rich source of omega-3’s every day. Recommended amount: at least 7 to 11 grams of omega-3’s per week which equates to 1 to 1.6 grams per day. Continue reading “Inflammation | Fish-Free Omega-3’s”

Inflammation | Sorting Out the Omega-3’s

Plant-based and animal sources of Omega-3 acidsOmega-3 fatty acids are polyunsaturated fats and consist of three types: EPA, DHA and ALA. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are primarily found in certain kinds of fish. Another type of omega-3 fatty acid, alpha-linolenic acid  (ALA), is found in plants.

Certain types of fish are rich in EPA and DHA. These essential polyunsaturated fats reduce C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6, two inflammatory proteins in your body. A six-month study demonstrated that consuming 960 mg/day of EPA and 600 mg/day of DHA lowered CRP.¹

To lower your risk of mercury exposure from eating fish, be sure to choose the right fish*.

Swordfish_dollarphotoclub_75683664*Avoid larger, longer-living fish, such as shark and swordfish, as they tend to accumulate more mercury than the smaller fish like sardines, sole, and trout.

Per Consumer Reports, a 6-oz. serving of:

  • Salmon contains 4 mcg of mercury
  • Canned albacore tuna contains 60 mcg 
  • Swordfish contains 170 mcg 

Oily fish high in omega-3 fatty acids include:

How much: At least 3 to 4 ounces of fish, twice a week

Apple c heart symbol_40x54Fit Tip: If you don’t eat fish, you can actually drink it in the form of orange juice! Tropicana® Orange Juice Pure Premium Healthy Heart Orange Juice is fortified with actual fish (tilapia, sardine and anchovy). Also, grass-fed beef  is often higher in omega-3 fatty acids than conventional beef due to their diet of grass and foraged foods versus grains, such as corn.

Source:
¹Fish oil supplementation lowers C-reactive protein levels independent of triglyceride reduction in patients with end-stage renal disease. Nutrition Clinical Practice. 2009.

 Stay tuned! Up next… “Fish-Free Omega-3’s

Hawaiian Habanero Black Cod

istock_000018096644xsmall_black cod_tuna_croppedBlack Cod — also known as Butterfish and Sablefish — contains as much as 30% more heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids as wild salmon, except King Salmon.

This delicacy has a soft texture and a buttery richness (similar to Chilean Sea Bass) that makes this fish highly prized overseas, particularly in Japan.  It’s no wonder that it’s also popularly known as ‘Butterfish’.  Black Cod survives in the deep frigid waters of the North Pacific which is why it accumulates a substantial amount of essential fatty acids.

This fish has a very mild flavor as opposed to other types, such as salmon or mackerel. Due to it’s mildness, Black Cod is easily enlivened with savory flavors, such as this Hawaiian habanero marinade.   It’s made from a base of natural soy sauce and is blended with silky papaya habanero chili preserves, tangy orange juice, a kick of fresh ginger, and an added dash of heat (jalapeno peppers).

Serve over a bed of Japanese buckwheat noodles (soba) and a side of steamed broccoli for an absolutely heavenly meal.  Drizzle the cooking juices over everything and enjoy!   Continue reading “Hawaiian Habanero Black Cod”