Lower Your Blood Pressure with Food

Did you know a sweet potato has ___ much more potassium as banana?
Did you know that a sweet potato has 65% more potassium than a banana?

“Low Sodium”, “Salt-Free”, “Reduced Sodium”, “Unsalted”. Living a healthy life today means you don’t shake or utter that four-letter word… SALT. You’ve banished it from your favorite recipes, family table and your heart-healthy pantry. But the dietary approach to managing your blood pressure involves another key mineral — not just salt.

Low levels of potassium in your diet may be just as much of a risk factor for high blood pressure as high levels of sodium. Aim for a balance of less salt and more potassium in your daily eating plan. Here’s why…

Potassium helps to:

  • Relax your blood vessel walls¹ (contributing to more flexible arteries)
  • Lower your blood pressure (by helping you excrete excess sodium through your urine)
  • Reduce damage to your arteries (from the decrease in pressure)

Not only do studies suggest a link between low potassium levels and high blood pressure² but to higher glucose/insulin levels as well. See VIDEO: Potassium and Type 2 Diabetes   

Products containing potassium

Not Just Bananas

Eat more potassium-rich foods, such as a wide variety of fruits, vegetables, and legumes — not just bananas. Many people think of bananas when they think of foods high in potassium, but they are actually near the bottom of the list of high potassium foods (over 400 mg. potassium per serving):    Continue reading “Lower Your Blood Pressure with Food”

Test Finds 3X More Breast Tumors & Why It’s Not Available to You

Working with a team of physicists, Dr. Deborah Rhodes developed a new nuclear medicine technique for tumor detection called MBI (Molecular Breast Imaging). It’s three times as effective as traditional mammograms for women with dense breast tissue and uses a third the compression force.

mammogram vs mbi3The life-saving implications are stunning. So why haven’t we heard of it? Rhodes shares the story behind the tool’s creation, and the web of politics and economics that keep it from mainstream use.

Watch Dr. Rhodes’ compelling TED Conference talk on evox Television.

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Why I’m Now a Statistic… Protect Yourself Against Skin Cancer

Two weeks ago I had a biopsy and yesterday I found out I have cancer. Not pre-cancer… the real deal. Basal cell carcinoma. I’ve learned it’s one of the most common types of skin cancer, but knowing that I now join 2.2 million other Americans diagnosed each year doesn’t make my diagnosis any less daunting or serious.

I’m still dazed in disbelief. It’s not because I’m not a likely candidate. I admit it, I am. I grew up in the sun. As an active athletic kid, staying indoors was not an option. I can still hear my mom’s repeated warnings at the sight of my golden tan or raging sunburn, “You better stay out of the sun. You’ll get freckles. Worse yet, you’ll get skin cancer.” Well, once again, Mom was right.

As a youngster and young adult in my 20’s, I spent my summers on the tennis courts, by the pool, or on a boat or bike. Winters didn’t keep me from being a UV target either. I lived on the mountain and skied competitively, so in reality, I clocked in thousands of hours under the sun on the glorious slopes of Lake Tahoe.

What actually shocks me about the cancer diagnosis is the benign nature of the tumor. I’ve read the rules for skin cancer and examined the well publicized graphic photos, but my lesion doesn’t resemble any of the textbook examples. There is NO discoloration. It’s not brown, black or red. In fact, my doctor described it as “translucent”.

It’s one of those things I noticed while putting on my makeup some time ago. I casually thought about getting this small ‘bump’ removed someday, but considered such action as purely cosmetic and neither a big deal or urgent. However, during a routine head-to-toe skin cancer exam, my dermatologist regarded the bump as suspicious.    Continue reading “Why I’m Now a Statistic… Protect Yourself Against Skin Cancer”

Alzheimer’s Predictor

Researchers are optimistic that they found a new way to predict Alzheimer’s disease. Karen Owoc, The Health Reporter™, hosts this compact segment of TV health news in The Health Reporter Minute. Writer/Producer: Karen Owoc.

New Risk Factors for Memory Loss

High cholesterol can lead to dementia.

A new study revealed that high cholesterol and high blood pressure are not only risk factors for heart disease, but for early memory loss as well.  Cardiovascular risk and cognitive function were tested in nearly 5,000 men and women over age 55.

The researchers studied participants for 10 years and found those with a ten percent higher risk of cardiovascular problems also scored poorly on cognitive tests.  The tests measured reasoning, memory, fluency, and vocabulary and the results were then compared to their Framingham risk score.   Continue reading “New Risk Factors for Memory Loss”