KRON 4 | Are You Susceptible to Stress?

Stressed

Have you ever wondered why some people deal better with stress while you suffer from its unhealthy effects, e.g., weight gain, frequent headaches, high blood pressure, heart disease, forgetfulness, frequent colds, and neck/back pain to name just a few?

Where Stress Begins

Stress is encountered in almost every aspect of your life and is a major cause of not being able to stick to a healthy eating and exercise plan. But the degree in which people experience stress lies in their attitudes. Do you tackle life with a positive outlook or are you easily defeated? 

If you possess any of the following nine attitudes or issues, you could be the source of your own stress. Are you…

Impatient – If you’re impatient, You are critical of how others perform. You expect others to work, walk, drive (you name it) faster. If other people don’t meet your lightning speed standards, you boil over inside and are never at peace.

A perfectionist – If you’re a perfectionist, you strive to be perfect in all the things you do. Since it’s not possible to be “perfect”, you often feel anxiety, disappointment, pressure, and a sense of failure.

Always ‘on the go’ – If you’re unable to relax, you’re always working and jumping from one project or chore to another. You never stop to relax and calm your body and mind. This builds up to what’s called a “deadly stress momentum”. It’s not the act of keeping busy that causes your tension and angst, it’s when you continually push yourself that builds stress.

Powerless – If you’re in a role, whether at home or at work, where your feelings or opinions are not respected or heard, you feel unimportant and thus, feel an inner contempt. Practice asserting yourself to diminish your susceptibility to stress.

Angry crazy designer yelling and crumpling paper on his workplace

Angry and explosive – If you’re angry, you’re often loud, explosive and mad about people and things. You may have heard it’s good to “let go” of your feelings and not let them build up inside, but there are more constructive ways to control your anger before it controls you.   Continue reading “KRON 4 | Are You Susceptible to Stress?”

KRON 4 | Here’s Why You May Be Carrying a 40-lb Head

Occupational and recreational habits have led to real pains in the neck. Tension and poor posture rank high as the most common pain generators. KRON 4 Morning News anchor, Marty Gonzalez, helps me demonstrate the effects of poor posture and how to fight the aching forces of gravity.

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Forward Head Posture (FHP)

One of the most common postural problems is forward head posture — for both young and old. Forward head posture is also known as:

    • Text neck, computer/notebook neck
    • Sofa neck
    • Book or reader’s neck
    • Driver’s neck

KRON 4 PosturePain1Your head should sit directly on your neck and shoulders. Think of a golf ball on a tee. But the head is more like a bowling ball (weighing about 10 to 11 lbs) than a golf ball. Your neck and shoulders have to carry the burden of this “bowling ball” all day. Supporting and moving the human head is a challenging and tiring task.

Carrying your head is an isometric contraction — you’re actually “strength training”. An isometric exercise is a static hold where the joint angle and muscle length does not change during the muscle contraction. 

Posture_AdobeStock_113073952_croppedCorrect posture: Your ears line up over your shoulder blades.

Incorrect posture: Along with forward head posture, your shoulders also “round” and roll forward.

Causes of Forward Head Posture

Repetitive use of computers, TV, video games, trauma, and even backpacks/laptop bags have forced the body forward. Also, general muscle weakness from illness or aging can cause FHP —  that is, you’re too weak to hold your own head up anymore.

KRON 4 PosturePain2

When you’re holding your head forward (out of alignment), you are putting additional strain on your neck, shoulders, and upper back muscles. The result? Muscle fatigue and an aching neck and back. Here’s why…    Continue reading “KRON 4 | Here’s Why You May Be Carrying a 40-lb Head”

Marijuana and Stroke Risk

Marijuana Logo High Quality

As marijuana is becoming more widely accessible and used for medical or recreational use, its use has been associated with increased risks for stroke and heart failure.

Research* presented at the American College of Cardiology annual scientific session, found marijuana use was associated with a significantly increased risk for:

Marijuana use was also associated with risk factors known to raise cardiovascular risk, such as:

  • Obesity
  • High blood pressure
  • Smoking
  • Alcohol use

After adjusting for those risk factors, marijuana use was independently linked with the following in their analysis:

  • 26 percent higher risk of stroke
  • 10 percent higher risk of developing heart failure   

Continue reading “Marijuana and Stroke Risk”

Junk Food Leads to More Than Waist Gain

Americans kill themselves from the food they eat.

Heart disease is often blamed on genetics (your mom, dad, grandparents…) BUT over 360,000 Americans manage to kill themselves each year from the food they eat. Cardiovascular disease is the country’s number one killer and coronary artery disease or ischemic heart disease (where plaque-filled arteries literally choke off oxygen to your heart) leads the way.

Blausen_0257_CoronaryArtery_Plaque_credit_edited-1

Brain and Heart_600x1022Coronary heart disease accounts for 1 in 7 deaths in the United States per year. But plaque not only builds up in your coronary arteries, it builds up in the vessels of your brain as well. And the result? Your brain shrinks.

BRAIN CELLS DIE

Unfortunately, the fat-laden, sugar-heavy junk you consume (and find so addictive) often packs on pounds around your middle. Abdominal obesity has been shown to kill brain cells. According to a study published in the Annals of Neurology, having more belly fat is associated with a decrease in total brain volume in middle-aged adults.

KRON 4 | Exercise Heart Rates Can Indicate Health and Predict Death

You know you need to work out, but wonder how hard you need to exercise and how you can tell if you’re actually becoming more fit. The key is in understanding your different heart rates and what those numbers actually mean.

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1. Heart Rate is the average number of times your heart beats per minute. Your heart ‘beats’ when it contracts and pumps blood through your body.

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2. Resting Heart Rates indicates your basic overall heart health. The more conditioned you are, the less effort it takes to pump blood through your body and will be reflected in a lower resting heart rate. 

To get a resting exercise heart rate, take your pulse after being still for five or more minutes, preferably in the same position you’ll be in during exercise. That is, if you’re going to walk, then stand quietly for five minutes and then note your heart rate.

KRON 4_Exercise HR3

3. Warm-Up Heart Rate is a heart rate that should be HALFWAY between your resting heart rate and target heart rate. By monitoring your warm-up heart rate, you can assess whether you’ve transitioned properly from rest to exercise with respect to:

    • Increased blood flow
    • Body temperature
    • Oxygen transport
    • Metabolism

This will reduce the onset of lack of oxygen (ischemia), chest pain (angina), irregular heart beats (arrhythmias), and other dysfunctions during the conditioning exercise phase.

4. Maximum Heart Rate is the highest number of times your heart contracts in one minute. It can be determined accurately via a graded exercise test, i.e., a stress test on a treadmill, or can be predicted by your age.    Continue reading “KRON 4 | Exercise Heart Rates Can Indicate Health and Predict Death”