New! Anti-Aging Exercise Class

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I started a new class from 10:30-12:00 noon on Tuesdays and Thursdays (HealthStyleRx2) and it is already gaining popularity. Here’s why…

The Goal:  To increase metabolism and improve functionality because you have to move, lift, balance, and support your body in this class. Intensive flexibility training improves and maintains mobility.

Rx2 is an ‘advanced’ class and therefore, not for beginning exercisers. It is more challenging, but is still inclusive with plenty of modifications.

How It Is Different

The main difference with the Rx2 class compared to Rx1:

  • Semi-private and limited to 4 people maximum per session
  • More time spent on strength training routines
  • Pilates floor work instead of the Pilates reformer

Specific exercise sequences focus on:

  • Strengthening and lengthening muscles (upper/lower extremities)
  • Targeting postural muscles
  • Improving bone health and cardiorespiratory function
  • Protecting the spine

These sequences incorporate bodyweight, stability, and resistance training techniques plus circuit and metabolic training.

Building muscle and bone mass are the keys to longevity and weight loss. 

Blood Pressure Monitoring

Pre- and post-blood pressure readings are taken and recorded just like other Rx classes.

Who Can Benefit from Rx2

Rx2 is for the ‘experienced’ exerciser, but that does not mean you must be able to perform at a high level. Rx2 participants have engaged regularly in some type of fundamental exercise training and are highly motivated.

Cost

You can add the Tue/Thu Rx2 workout to your current weekly routine or substitute when you miss a M-W-F session. The price is the same as Rx1, so you can choose whether you want to attend the Rx1 class on M-W-F or the Rx2 class on T-Th or both.

I’m excited to offer this new class! Feel free to contact me with any questions: (925) 413.6207.

Location: IMX Pilates and Fitness, 2410 San Ramon Valley Blvd., Suite 112 | San Ramon, CA

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Weight Train After Your Heart Attack and Live Longer

Man has heart attack

After your heart attack or some other “cardiac event”, such as a coronary artery bypass graft and/or stent placement, you may have received conflicting advice as to what level of activity is acceptable. Some of the things you may have heard are:

  • Don’t lift anything over 5 lbs.
  • Don’t lift anything over 10 lbs. “for a while”.
  • Don’t lift anything for a week.
  • Don’t drive more than 30 minutes.
  • Don’t “get exhausted” for a month.
  • Don’t exercise for a few weeks.
  • Don’t lift over 5 lbs. for a period of time — or ever.
  • Go back to whatever you were doing before.

These guidelines can be confusing and promote anxiety and inactivity. Physicians generally prescribe aerobic/endurance exercise, such as walking, to strengthen your cardiorespiratory system, but in order to return to activities of daily living (ADLs), resistance training is necessary to accomplish everyday tasks, such as:

  • Mowing the lawn
  • Vacuuming
  • Carrying your children, groceries, or suitcase
  • Loading and unloading the trunk of a car/truck
  • Bending over to pick up the newspaper or toys off the floor
  • Lifting your grandchildren
  • Placing or removing items from a high shelf
  • Closing the trunk of a car or van
  • Opening a heavy door (e.g., door of a car, building, refrigerator, freezer, or dishwasher)

Resistance training enables you to perform these daily tasks safely, independently and more efficiently. By having a stronger musculoskeletal system, you decrease the cardiac demands of daily activities and increase your endurance capacity for other activities. Strength training has also been shown to maintain and build stronger bones as well as slow or prevent bone loss. A strong structure will reduce your risk for developing other debilitating diseases (e.g., osteoporosis) and ultimately help you live a longer, stronger and happier life.

Grandparents And Grandson Playing Game Indoors TogetherMuscular strength and endurance are important to prevent falls and safely return to vocational and recreational activities as well as activities of daily living. Most people need to do some type of lifting, carrying, or pushing in their daily routine. Your body has nine (9) fundamental human movement patterns. The foundation of your workouts should develop these movements:    Continue reading “Weight Train After Your Heart Attack and Live Longer”