Tag Archives: Cancer

Soy Foods and Breast Cancer Survivors

New studies show soy is now good for breast cancer survivors

For years, there’s been confusing debate over whether breast cancer survivors should eat soy. However, a new study presented at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) found that women who ate the most soy food didn’t increase their risk of breast cancer recurrence, but reduced their risk.

Since soy foods contain large amounts of isoflavones, survivors had been advised against consuming them. Isoflavones are phytochemicals (chemicals found in plants) that have both estrogen-like and anti-estrogenic effects.   Continue reading

Curing Your Acrylics – Is It Safe?


TV segment #0005H

UVA rays from nail dryers may cause cancer

Artificial nails have become increasingly popular and according to the U.S. Census Bureau figures, revenue for nail salons amounted to $1.6 billion in 2005. If you’re hooked on augmenting your natural nails, the next time you head off to the salon, you might want to bring along some sunscreen.

A University of Texas study published in the 2009 Archives of Dermatology found that two women who frequently used UV nail dryers developed skin cancer on the backs of their hands. These two healthy middle-aged women with no personalor family history of skin cancer developed non-melanoma (basal or squamous cell):   Continue reading

When the Going Gets Tough

Constipation relief is more about fitness than fiber

Constipation is not a subject that many of us like to talk about. But let’s face it, everyone gets constipated at one time or another and it can be pretty painful, uncomfortable, and frustrating. Here are some ways to help keep you moving!

1. Get some exercise. Your intestines are muscles too. When you work out, you’re doing more than just toning your muscles and strengthening your heart. Bowel movements occur when the muscles of your intestinal tract contract. When exercising aerobically, your heart and breathing rates increase which help your intestinal muscles contract. Well-toned intestinal muscles contract well and are able to move food through the tract efficiently and naturally.   Continue reading

Radiation Exposure “Antidote”

Radiation Exposure

Potassium iodide - an antidote for radiation exposure?

Nuclear plant explosions in Japan released massive columns of smoke into the air.  According to officials, 230,000 units of iodine have been distributed to evacuation centers near the nuclear power plants as a precaution. So, why is Japan distributing iodine tablets?

Thyroid Effects

After the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, thousands of cases of thyroid cancer were reported in children and adolescents exposed to radiation. Following a radiological or nuclear event, escaping radioactive particulates consisting of radioactive iodine-131 can enter your body via contaminated air, food, or water (referred to as “internal contamination”).   Continue reading

BPA-coated Receipts

Cash register receipts may be coated with BPA.

It’s getting to be that time again…April 15th is just two months away!  If you’re  busy gathering up a year’s worth of your receipts, you might want to consider using some gloves during the process.

A study by the Environmental Working Group revealed that BPA (bisphenol-A) is not just showing up in plastic bottles and food cans, but in many cash register receipts printed on BPA-coated thermal paper.  BPA is a synthetic estrogen with strong evidence that it causes reproductive abnormalities, gene alterations and cancer.  According to the EWG, the amount of BPA is 250 to 1,000 times higher on one of these receipts than the amount in a typical food can.   Continue reading

Raw Vegetables – Are They Healthier?

[TV segment #0002   Producer: Karen Owoc

 

With the advent of the raw food culture, is it healthier to eat your vegetables raw rather than cooked?  Take a look…
Expanded transcript… I’m often asked if it’s healthier to eat vegetables raw.  Some people think cooking destroys valuable enzymes, vitamins and minerals.  But cooking has a purpose. It breaks down the insoluble fiber which softens the vegetables so they’re edible.  And as it turns out, raw vegetables are not always healthier than cooked.  Here’s why….   Continue reading

Sunscreen Additive and Skin Damage

An FDA study found a form of vitamin A, that’s used in sunscreens may actually speed up skin damage.  41% of over 500 sunscreens contain vitamin A, or retinyl palmitate, due to its popularity for preventing wrinkles in cosmetics.  However, preliminary data showed even low doses of this additive may be unsafe.

When applied to the skin, retinyl palmitate reacted with sunlight and increased the development of skin tumors and lesions.  This is disturbing since sunscreens are formulated and promoted as protection against sun damage. The Environmental Working Group researchers recommend only 39 (or eight percent) of the sunscreens on the market this summer.     Continue reading

Meat Diet and Early Puberty

A diet high in meat may cause early puberty in girls according to new research.  It found that 14 per cent more seven-year-old girls started their periods by age twelve when they ate over twelve servings of meat per week versus four.

One hundred years ago, girls began puberty at age 14 (and boys at age 16).  Girls who start their periods early face a higher risk of breast and ovarian cancers and heart disease. Although further studies are needed in other populations, evidence suggests it’s healthiest to consume less meat.  Researchers agree that something is affecting our children, whether it’s chemicals, hormones or inactivity.   Continue reading

Men’s Health Awareness Month

If you aren’t already aware, June is Men’s Health and Cancer Awareness Month.  It was designated in 1994 to encourage early detection and treatment of disease.  Routine health screenings and diagnostic tests can save the lives of both men and boys.  In the U.S., over five million men have been diagnosed with some form of cancer.  Prostate, colon, lung, and skin cancers most often affect men.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more men die from cancer, heart disease, injuries, stroke and diabetes than women.  However, they are half as likely to go to the doctor for annual exams and preventive care.   Recommended screening tests (previous blog entry):  How to Stay Healthy if You’re a Man.

Continue reading

Bisphenol A (BPA) in Canned Foods

Potentially harmful levels of the chemical bisphenol A (BPA), a known endocrine disruptor, were found in common canned foods.  Researchers of the National Work Group for Safe Markets, a coalition of public health and environmental health groups, tested 50 cans for BPA contamination.  BPA is the key compound in epoxy resin linings that keeps food fresher longer.  The chemical lining also prevents the food from interacting with the metal and altering the taste.   Continue reading

‘Daily Detox and Health Beverage’ – Is It Really?

Q:“Resurrect Daily Detox and Health Beverage” – Is it really as healthy as it claims to be? ~ M.N., South Lake Tahoe, CA

Resurrect ElixirA: The makers of this beverage, Healthy Innovations, Inc., assert their:

“…elixir is becoming a part of the daily diet for the health conscious individual.  Formulated with 22 vitamins, aminos, electrolytes, and herbs, our unique blend of ingredients help to detoxify your body and energize your soul.”

Ingredients: Carbonated Water, Citric Acid, Natural and Artificial Flavors, Sodium Citrate, Caramel Color, Sucralose, Sodium Benzoate, Potassium Sorbate

Nutrition Facts: 5 calories – 0 g Sugar – 2 g carbohydrates – 30 mg caffeine per 12 oz can – 60 mg Vitamin C

This beverage is basically a glorified soda containing artificial sugar (sucralose) and flavors.  What is most concerning is the fact that it contains sodium benzoate and vitamin C.  Refer to post How to Prevent Cancer and Aging (Sodium Benzoate) for more details.   Continue reading

How to Prevent Aging and Cancer (Synthetic Fragrances)

Q:  I am really sensitive to perfume and fragranced body products (especially soaps and lotions).  I get a rash and I cough when I spray on perfume or am near someone wearing heavy cologne.  What’s in them that is so irritating? ~ K.A., Huntington Beach, CA

Artificial fragrances are common allergens and irritants

Artificial fragrances are common allergens and irritants

A: Artificial fragrances are synthetically-derived substances used solely to impart an odor.  They are a common offender of adverse allergic reactions.

In a study by the North American Contact Dermatitis Group, fragrances were the number one cause of allergic and irritant reactions to cosmetics.  (Preservatives were the second most common cause of cosmetic allergies.)

Does This Smell Good To You?

Fragrance manufacturers are exempt from disclosing ingredients

Fragrance manufacturers may use any raw material in fragrance formulas

Pre-market approval of fragrance materials is NOT required.  With the exception of color additives and nine prohibited ingredients, fragrance manufacturers may use any raw material in a fragrance formula and are exempt from disclosing the chemicals on their label.

Fragrance ingredients need only be listed on the label as “fragrance” thereby limiting the FDA’s surveillance and actual authority over the fragrance industry.

Fragrance Free or Unscented…..Are They Really?

Fragrance freeThere are no official government definitions for “fragrance free”, “unscented”, or “natural fragrance”. In short, manufacturers can formulate their own interpretation of such label claims.

Commercial “fragrance free” or “unscented” products are rare and may only mean they have no discernible scent. Companies may add a masking fragrance to a product to conceal the odor of its raw ingredients without adding a discernible odor to it.   Continue reading

How to Prevent Cancer (Soap and Animal Fats)

Q: What’s the difference between the more expensive soap made with vegetable oils and the cheaper commercial brands of soap? ~ D.W., Los Angeles, CA

A: Soap is the resultant compound made by reacting fat (either from vegetables or animals) with sodium hydroxide.  The less expensive, commercially-manufactured soaps use tallow (animal fat).

Tallow – Is It Fit To Be Fat?

Tallow is a low-cost waste product of the meat industry.  It is basically fat stripped from slaughtered cattle, but it may also include fat rendered from slaughtered sheep and pigs.

Ivory is made from tallow

Ivory is made from tallow

Soap manufactured from animal fat is called sodium tallowate.  50% of a slaughtered steer is tallow and bones – the main ingredient of commercial mass-produced soap.  Ivory® states that their tallow comes from meat processing scraps and consists of beef and/or pork hide and bones.

The Skinny on Animal Fat

According to the United States Department of Agriculture, from the time cattle hides are removed from the animal, rapidly-growing bacteria populates the fresh hide.  In order to control bacterial growth, bactericides and detergent or large amounts of salt need to be used as a preservative.  Further, cattle hide is one of the primary sources of E.coli contamination on carcasses.   Continue reading

How to Prevent Aging and Cancer (Sodium Benzoate)

Benzoates are widely used preservatives

Sodium benzoate (also known as E211) is a chemical preservative used to help inhibit the growth of bacteria and fungus in acidic products. It is linked to aging and cancer and is widely used in foods, beverages, cosmetic, dental care products, and pharmaceuticals that contain:

  • Vinegar (salad dressings, pickled foods)
  • Carbonic acid (carbonated drinks)
  • Citric acid (jams, fruit juices, cough syrups, baby wipes, liquid hand soaps)
  • Alcohol (alcohol-based mouthwash)
  • Other high acids (soy sauce, Chinese food sauces)

Manufactured from Crude Oil

Sodium benzoate is used in some sodas

Sodium benzoate is used in some sodas

This crystalline powder is the sodium salt of benzoic acid and is produced by reacting sodium hydroxide (lye) with benzoic acid.  Benzoic acid is commercially manufactured by reacting toluene with oxygen.  Toluene, also known as methylbenzene or phenylmethane, is related to benzene (a carcinogenic substance). Toluene is found in crude oil and used to make gasoline.

Due to the unpleasant aftertaste of sodium benzoate and not so much for toxicity, sodium benzoate concentration is limited by the FDA in the U.S. and should not exceed 0.1% by weight.  Potassium benzoate, the potassium salt of benzoic acid, is an alternative preservative to sodium benzoate.  When lower sodium content is required, potassium benzoate is used in place of sodium benzoate.    Continue reading

How to Stay Healthy If You’re a Man

Male signOne of the most important ways for men at any age to stay healthy and live longer is to get recommended screening tests.  These tests can detect diseases early (i.e. cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and more) when they are easier to treat.

NOTE: If you have risk factors, a diagnosed condition, or a family history of certain diseases, talk to your physician.  The types of tests, when you start testing, and how often you test may differ from the standard recommendations below.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends screening for the following diseases:

Scale1.  Obesity: Have your Body Mass Index (BMI) calculated to screen for obesity.  BMI is a tool that is used to measure body fat by the weight (in kilograms) to height (in meters) ration of an individual.  A BMI of 25 – 29.9 kg/m indicates overweight and a BMI greater than 30 kg/m indicates obesity.

You can use the BMI calculator from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute to find your own BMI.

2.  High Cholesterol (age 45+): Starting at age 35, have your blood checked regularly for cholesterol levels (fasting blood test).  Talk to your provider about testing earlier if you are younger than 35 and if:

  • You have diabetes.
  • You have high blood pressure.
  • You have a family history of heart disease.
  • You smoke.

Sphygmomanometer BloodPressure3.  High Blood Pressure (age 18+): Starting at age 18, have your blood pressure checked at least every two years.  A blood pressure reading of 140/90 and above is high.

4.  Colorectal Cancer (age 50+): Starting at age 50, your physician can decide which test is right for you.   Continue reading

How to Stay Healthy If You’re a Woman

Female signOne of the most important ways for women at any age to stay healthy and live longer is to get recommended screening tests.  These tests can detect diseases early (i.e. cancer, heart disease, osteoporosis, and more) when they are easier to treat.

NOTE: If you have risk factors, a diagnosed condition, or a family history of certain diseases, talk to your physician.  The types of tests, when you start testing, and how often you test may differ from the standard recommendations below.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends screening for the following diseases:

Weight_Scale1.  Obesity: Have your Body Mass Index (BMI) calculated to screen for obesity.  BMI is a tool that is used to measure body fat by the weight (in kilograms) to height (in meters) ration of an individual.  A BMI of 25 – 29.9 kg/m indicates overweight and a BMI greater than 30 kg/m indicates obesity.

You can use the BMI calculator from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute to find your own BMI.

2.  Breast Cancer (age 40+): Starting at age 20, the American Cancer Society recommends getting a Clinical Breast Exam (CBE) by your health care provider about every 3 years.  Breast self-exam (BSE) is also an option for women starting in their 20s.  At age 40, you should have a mammogram every year and a CBE prior to the mammogram.

3.  High Cholesterol (age 45+): Starting at age 45, have your blood checked regularly for cholesterol levels (fasting blood test).  Talk to your provider about testing earlier if you are younger than 45 and if:

  • You have diabetes.
  • You have high blood pressure.
  • You have a family history of heart disease.
  • You smoke.   Continue reading